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  1. #1
    Disciplinary. INTY's Avatar
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    Metro: Last Light- Xbox 360



    So this is an interesting one for me. I was vaguely familiar with the previous game in this series, that being Metro 2033, but have never actually played it. After watching Totalbiscuit’s WTF is of this game I decided I was very interested in it. Bear that in mind, that I haven't played Last Light's predecessor and from what I can tell that will matter with this game. On that note this review is going to have spoilers for Metro 2033, so don't read this if you're interested in that game as well. As is the norm this review is specifically covering the Xbox 360 version of the game, so certain details may not be the case with copies of the game for other platforms. Also, note that this review is split into two posts for the sake of dealing with the 5 images post limitation.

    Writing, themes and aesthetics.

    Metro Last Light is a linear first-person shooter set a year after the events of Metro 2033, where main character Artyom tackles his guilt for having committed genocide on the Dark One mutants via the missile strike in the previous game, now believing that they may have actually been peaceful creatures. While 3 separate factions of survivors are uneasily existing in the Metro, making their own plans, a Dark One has been spotted on the surface, and your mission is to kill it, though of course with a Dark One involved, the mission isn't going to go that simply.

    Now aye, I haven't played Metro 2033 and as I said this is one of few games at the minute where having not played the previous installment will actually leave you somewhat confused without having played the first. How ever in my case, the Limited Edition of the game that me and Han have came with a digital comic (by Dark Horse if that interests you) that somewhat covers the events of the first game, so I think I have an idea of what's happened through reading it. If you don't have access to the comic, then I would recommend playing Metro 2033 before going into Last Light, or at least reading up on the events.

    All right, the most important aspect to Metro: Last Light's writing I find is its atmosphere. This hit me instantly with the atmosphere: we've lost. This isn't a post-apocalyptic story where there's an ongoing battle for humanity. This is a post-apocalyptic story where there's no battle going on. The world has been totally ravaged by the events of World War III, and is now practically owned by the mutants, leaving nothing for human-kind, or rather what is left of it, who now survive in 'the Metro'; underground in the train systems and tunnel-ways. While humanity hasn't given up hope, it's clear that they can't make any great push to re-claim their home due to the effects of the nuclear fallout, so for now they must just survive. The world of Metro is very bleak and joyless, and it captures this brilliantly. The underground bases are tight, packed, dark and without much cheer. The surface world is a hopeless, depressing ruin and the opposition, be they the mutants or the different groups of humans, are not pleasant in the slightest, visiting very dark areas of humanities history with their acts.


    Looks familiar eh?

    So yeah, the world of Metro's probably one of its more defining points, but how about what goes on in it? In all fairness, as you might imagine with the world being the way it is, the story isn't particularly urgent and doesn't manage to bring much weight on its own terms until the last third of the game. Is it still interesting event-wise though? Yes, and mostly due to its pacing. The writers clearly had a good understanding of this, with how the game is balanced between dialogue, exposition, game-play sequences and scripted event sequences. It's probably one of the better paced games I've come across in terms of that and the intrigue rate is pretty good, juggling between tense trips to the surface and bleakly hopeful walks through the underground colonies, seeing how humanity's getting on in its current state. Speaking of which, the characters are what you'd expect for a world like this, pretty tired. There's not much enthusiasm in the world of Metro and you won't find a great deal of the survivors in high spirits. Artyom on this note, is one of many mute lead roles in a first-person shooter. Also should say on that topic that the game comes with two voice options, English and Russian. The English voice actors can be pretty bad a lot of the time, distractingly so, so I'd lean towards recommending you to playing the game in Russian. Adds a bit of authenticity to the whole thing as the game is set in Russia for one thing, and for another it won't distract you with the voice acting quality.

    As for the games themes, it's a pretty tense experience, the most tense game I've played so far, to be frank. This is at its strongest when visiting the surface world, as the air is contaminated due to the fall-out of World War III, and so every second you spend on the surface must be spent with a Gas-mask, which runs on filters which don't exactly last long. They are scattered around the place, so you need to look around for them to make sure you don't run out of oxygen-while also of course dealing with the imposing mutants, which I'll get into later. Quite a lot of the time though, this means that the game does manage to make you feel like you're in an urgent hurry due to the nature of the surface world, which is something most games don't achieve.

    So Metro Last Light's not one you're particularly going to want to visit for the story, so much as the experience, which is heavily boosted by the games atmosphere and world. I'm gonna say it's mainly the games design that makes the experience as good as it is, but the context really does its share of the work as well. It's certainly one of the most well realized and established worlds in a game in that regard. And then there's the aesthetics. This is all pretty damn impressive as well to be honest. Now I usually say the more colorful the better for a shooter, but here the grey pallet really suits Metro Last Light, of course due to the nature of the world. It's meant to look sad, and the world is supposed to look dead and lost. If it looked as pleasant as Bulletstorm can, then the atmosphere would be totally missed all together. This is not a happy place to be, at all. Never the less though, aside from its saddening appearance, the fidelity of the game is very high indeed.


    Attention to detail is very good here.

    Texture quality is high pretty much across the board, you won't find a lot of things with a low polygon count and…other than an unfortunate flame effect (not the one on the lighter above) nothing sticks out in memory that distracted me in the game physically. As far as the graphical quality goes all in all, it's solid, simply put. Perhaps not the most pleasant game to look at of course, but that's intentional. And then the music of the game, same as with the case of the Dead Space series is atmospherically boosting more than anything, nothing here that'll make your play-list, all though there are a few tracks here and there that over-do it in terms of how energetic they were-music that couples combat mainly. As for the games sound design, it's also solid! Guns sound very authentic, enemies all make very distinctive and convincing noises, and the sound design also goes to effort of boosting the game-play. With two examples, if a solider is walking by, his foot-steps grow louder the closer he comes, and when your gas-mask filter is about to run out, Artyom makes a rasping noise which grows progressively worse.

    Metro Last Light dabbles in areas that a lot of developers have forgotten about in late years, and it's how elements from game-play, aesthetics and writing can all meld together, working off of each other to boost the over-all experience. Sound design adds to the game-play and atmosphere via alerting subtleties such as the rasping Artyom makes when needing a gas-mask, the games physical appearance adds to the atmosphere with its grey palet, the atmosphere adds to the game experience due to making you feel more tense when on the surface-and every element is refined individually towards being of a very high quality as well. Metro Last Light has the most professionally put together presentation selection for a game that I've played so far. The world knows what it wants to be: a lost Earth that is imposing, gloomy and tense, and it makes that experience as well as you possibly could for the most part, and every element it uses to enforce this, is made to an A grade level. There is how ever one area where the game lets itself down a bit, and it's fan-service. I prefer not going into detail like this, but there's one random area that throws some scantily clad girls that are justified in context but, the way their breasts are interpreted is a bit immature, and it does stop the game in its tracks a bit. Especially when you can pay a stripper for a raunchy dance. That's something you'd expect from Duke Nukem, really.
    Last edited by INTY; 04-10-2013 at 02:08 AM.

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  2. #2
    Disciplinary. INTY's Avatar
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    Gameplay

    And I'm very glad to say what good I have to say for the game doesn't stop there. So, what good's a brilliantly realized world if you can't engross yourself in it, right? Worry not, because this is also the most immersing game I've played so far as well, and it is extremely good at it. I said earlier that the atmosphere was mainly achieved through certain things in the game-play? This is due to how much you can directly do as Artyom. So let's talk about Artyom, what he can do and what's available to him. Artyom's movement speed is adequate. While his walk is fairly slow, his non energy-limited run is acceptable, all though when moving through certain sequences, such as when you're in a civilian area, your movement speed is altered and somewhat slower. You have access to 3 gun slots, which is a nice compromise between realism and the players freedom.

    Now while there aren't many guns this is fair, as you can customize them pretty heavily, not in the sense of 'I can have 70 attachments on one gun', but every attachment available is pretty impacting and most of them add an interesting effect to the gun. You want to turn a double-barreled shotgun into a quad-barreled shotgun? Oh yeah that's here. In the end my load-out was that of a night-vision scoped pistol with a muzzled barrel, a quad-barreled shotgun (I nick-named this the car door) and a fairly standard assault rifle with a reflex sight, huge magazine and stock. You can do more things of course; if you want to personalize your gun with laser sights, or iron sights, or if you were ok sacrificing recoil reduction for heavier shots or visa versa, it's your choice. There's a really solid level of customization here, where you're not drowned in options, but all of the options as a result are very independently memorable and goos. And a pet approval for me, the upgrades do physically show on your gun. You can buy attachments at certain points in the game when survivors are open to trading with you, with the more powerful customizations being available further in.

    The guns themselves are pretty good too. They have a make-shift theme to them (especially with some of the attachments you can have where they're physically taped on) which makes them fairly interesting, and there's another physical touch I like to the Shambler Shotgun in particular, as a good example. It can have 4 shots, and these shells actually show on its sides, and when you fire, the bullet will disappear, showing you how many shots you've got left. Not all weapons have elements like this but, it's just an impressive show of detail. Speaking of their presentation, the guns are also very convincing. They're not exactly meaty and satisfying, but they are convincing, feeling a little bit lost in time, a little bit less advanced and as I said earlier, make-shift, and in those fields they are convincing. None of them sound like cap-guns, but none of them exactly make you feel like king of the world, which is appropriate for the games themes. So there's not a huge variety behind them, but they are nicely customizable to make up for this, and they all serve for certain purposes, even more so when modified. Some of them also have some recognizable recoil behind them, meaning you'll skillfully need to learn to adjust to that. You also have access to some secondary weapons, throwing knives which are fantastic for stealth, pipe bombs, Molotovs and Mines. Again, all serve their own functions. As well as with his weapons though, Artyom also has the ability to run right up to a human enemy (only advisable if they don't know you're there) for an instant, silent kill (interestingly, you can choose for the animation to be a knock-out or a kill. It changes nothing as far as I can tell, so it's your choice).

    So those are all of his killing capabilities. Now for some of the more intriguing things you need to manage as Artyom, these being the ones that add so heavily to the games immersion. Artyom's not just the guy with the gun. He's the guy with the lighter, clip-board, flash-light, charger, gas-mask, filters, compass and binoculars. Sounds like a lot of buttons for a controller doesn't it? Well, holding down LB will open up a separate interface for all of these items, where clicking their specific buttons will activate them. So far example, while crouch is toggled by clicking the B button, your binoculars are accessed by holding down LB and then clicking B, and you can't crouch while holding down LB.


    The interface that comes up for holding down LB.

    Pretty much all of these things help you through the game in their own subtle way. The Flash-lights usage is obvious, but it can actually run out of charge. To charge it up, you need to bring out your charger, and spam RT for a while until the flash-light's fully charged (during which you are vulnerable). This could just be a permanent flash-light, but actually needing to manually get out a charger to re-charge it with multiple clicks that connect to the ones Artyom visually does to charge the flash-light, do connect you to Artyom and what he's doing. Another option is taking out a lighter and a clip-board in each hand. You can click select to go into this mode (and then again to come out of it), and you can click LT for your left hand, activating your lighter which can be used to burn through Spiders webs, or to light up your clip-board, which you can bring up by clicking RT, and this shows your current objectives. Basically put, these features connect you to Artyom. Rather than making you stroll through a pause menu interface to read your objective, you personally have to raise the hand holding your clip-board to hold it up to your face, maybe even bring the lighter closer to it with your other hand.

    Even something like how you need to charge your flash-light. There are a few features here and there that could have just been automatically handled, but the developers decided to make them things that the player needs to deal with to further engross them in the game. An example of that is while you're wearing a gas-mask, it can get muck and blood streaked over it. Tapping LB has you wipe your visor to clear it up. The muck could have just cleared up over time, but instead you personally need to clear it off. All of these immersing features come together to ultimately both make you need to personally handle more things in the game as Artyom, in a way that link you to him, and also take away the need for an interface which would break the realism. Rather than a mission objective interface, it's on your clip-board. Rather than a timer interface for your gas-mask, the timer is actually on a watch which is around your wrist, that you can see because the game's a first-person shooter, and of course when you're out of time for your current filter you start to rasp, as a way of telling you 'oh ****, time to switch'. Small, subtle touches like this all really connect you to Artyom and put you in the game, engrossing you in the fantastically realized world of Metro.

    Now let's talk level design. The pacing in Metro's level design is pretty good, as would be suggested in what I said earlier. Good balance between blatant action sequences, sequences where stealth is heavily encouraged but never forced, exploration sequences and sequences where you're in a civilian area and can just have a trade or look around. All of these levels seem to be pretty well designed-with the strength of the game I find being in its stealth. Artyom has a few capabilities which really help him out during stealth, such as throwable, instantly and silently killing (and also retrievable) Knives, his watch will flash blue if he's currently in view of someone, and of course he can sneak up on someone and kill/knock them out for another silent take down. You can also shoot out, or go up to and switch off light sources to darken the area, making it harder for soldiers to see you.


    Before…after.

    The A.I also really compliments stealth, especially the soldiers. Soldiers have a lot of tells that make it easy to work around them. They all wear helmets with flash-lights strapped to their heads, so you'll be able to tell where they're looking in dark areas. Their foot-steps also help you to know how far away they are. If you mess up though, you're for the most part found out, and then you will be punished. This game's not afraid to kick your ass if you mess up, which is very boosting to both its tense atmosphere, game-play and it of course further encourages stealth in specific sequences. You can't just whimp out and cloak/run away like you can in Crysis 3, you're a regular guy. Good at what you do-but that's the thing, you'd better damn well be good at what you do in these sequences, or else you will find yourself in a lot of trouble. While you do have access to health kits (5 at the most) health does regenerate, but extremely slowly while in combat, as further punishment.

    As for the combat itself, yeah, this game really isn't afraid to kick your ass! Enemies have intelligent A.I, ranging from Soldiers that will throw grenades at you and mob you when they know where you are, to very savage mutants that are fast and hit hard. Have to say my favorite enemies were definitely the mutants, as for one thing, their A.I was the most interesting. You have mutants that behave in interesting ways, some times waiting for you to turn your back and keeping their distance, taking turns to attack you, all attacking at once, jumping from walls to get you and then there general movement is very animal-like as well, meaning you'll have to aim in specific ways to hit them, encouraging a ‘not until you see the whites of their eyes’ attitude with some. For another thing though the soldier A.I can be a bit derpy, doing stuff like coming right our of cover in the open to shoot at you. Mutant A.I doesn't seem to have derpy nature, and consistently does a good job of working with the creatures complex behavior and motion patterns to make an authentic feeling, organically behaving beast. There's a particular enemy I liked that was made weak by focusing your flash-light on it, and while the flash-light was on it, it would run backwards, actively looking for a wall to hide behind, undoing your progress from the flash-light on it.

    Aside from the combat oriented sequences though, the game also has some patience, giving you some times where you just soak in the atmosphere of the game, such as sequences where you're alone in tunnels and can hear things scuttling around you, sequences where you're crawling through vents and listening in on both major conversations and conversations that flesh out the nature of the world and sequences where mysterious, paranormal anomalies that show you traumatic pasts relevant to World War 3 occur. You get quite a few sequences where you also just walk through survivor camps, getting to listen to conversations, taking note of just how people are living and even getting to interact with people in certain ways-and all of this is optional, which further immerses you into it. If something's caught your interest, you'd have to stop walking yourself to listen to it, rather than being forced to watch it.
    There's even an entire stage show put on at one point that you can avoid if you want.

    As for exploration on that note, there's in all seriousness not that much. It's a linear first-person shooter to the truest honestly, straight-forward path with some out-cropping areas with some supply cases, collectible notes which expand on the story and world or long-since passed corpses to loot. Ah that reminds me, in the civilian areas, as I said earlier, you can trade with people. Your currency in this is an interesting one, that of ‘Military grade bullets’. These are highly sought after in the Metro, and you'll use them to purchase ammunition, supplies and attachments, but you can also use them yourself, as very powerful bullets, which some times you may need to.


    The interface shown when trading with a civilian.

    There were 2 instances in the game where I did actually run out of ammunition, and I was exploring reasonably thoroughly in my play-through. There's a reason for that though and I'll say it is an issue with the developers expectations for the game's weapon system. If your weapon runs out of ammo, that might be it for a while. You can loot human soldiers for bullets which is pretty reliable, but for some levels you'll be encountering nothing but mutants, which give you nothing. There were times where I ended up out of ammo for a weapon, and while I could have picked up a weapon from the ground, 'I've spent a hell of a lot of Military grade bullets upgrading my Car Door damn it! I don’t want to drop it and start from fresh by picking a gun up off of the ground', which is sort of what the game encourages, while also encouraging you to upgrade specific weapons. There's just a big counter-influence there which is really confusing.

    And if I was to mention the other issue the game has, it's that in the first few hours the game can be boringly linear. We're talking about the typical sequences of I've got to wait for this guy to come to the door before I can go through' or 'I've got to wait for you to shut up before I can go on' and there aren't even any out-cropping paths to explore at this point, just one way to go. Really dragged down the experience for me initially, and it even does come back occasionally, but I'd assure you it's worth trudging through. And the last negative thing I'll touch on is that the games hardest difficult settings are locked off unless you buy them from the marketplace, or if you ore-ordered the game, in which case they came with the game for you. The developers have insisted that this was very much demanded of them for the purposes of retail, but the situation is still regardless dodgy.



    Honestly? I would have given this game a 10. I could have given this game a 10/10, but, in all fairness those first few hours of very linear design, and a few other collective problems definitely prevent it from being a perfect game. Regardless though this is a damn fine game and I'm thoroughly impressed by it. It's rare that I ever feel really eager for more after I've played a game at the minute, but Last Light has left me wanting more levels, more content and just more Last Light! If another game comes out for this series, I'll be throwing my money at them if this is the standard. Last Light isn't just an achievement, brought about by inter-weaving A grade qualities such as its sound deign, graphics, characterization, pacing and story-telling to help create its brilliantly realized world, but all of this as well as the high tier game-play and certain aspects to it work towards making a world and experience that is of a high quality and one that immerses you in it. It's a great game folks, I can't say much more than that, and I wouldn't need to. While the first few hours aren't that special overall, while that one section of out of nowhere lava lamp boobs is distracting and while the business practice of removing the hardest difficulty as a pre-order bonus is despicable, don't let it alter your opinion on the game-or at least don't let the latter alter it. I can understand if the idea of those first few hours can alter your decision and intrigue, for certain, I do, but past that that, this is a great game and out of many of the things it does, it achieves them better than any other game I've played so far. In every other respect, it achieves in it very well…except the fan-service. Definitely worth looking into. The game. Not the fan-service.
    Last edited by INTY; 04-10-2013 at 02:23 AM.

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  3. #3
    Shadow Hide You Vault Hunter's Avatar
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    Solid review Dan. Haven't actually had nearly as much time to watch you on this as I would of liked so getting to read your review is even better in a way. I'll definitely be playing Last Light now that i've read this! The customisation options sound brilliant and the atmospheric tension you've described definitely sounds like something I could get in to very easily. Nice one

  4. #4
    WKD4496 Dark Seducer's Avatar
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    Good, now go play the first one and Fallout. I'm surprised neither of you played either of these games, you'd quite possibly enjoy them quite a bit. Good to see this one getting positive responses, definitely going to play the first once I get some of my unfinished games out the way. Had Metro 2033 for a long time now. I was told it was like the metro stations in Fallout 3, which turned me off slightly, because those stations weren't my favourite portion of that game, full of ghouls. ^^' Even though it's a completely different game I'm somewhat scarred from that metro experience.

  5. #5
    Disciplinary. INTY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Seducer View Post
    Good, now go play the first one and Fallout. I'm surprised neither of you played either of these games, you'd quite possibly enjoy them quite a bit. Good to see this one getting positive responses, definitely going to play the first once I get some of my unfinished games out the way. Had Metro 2033 for a long time now. I was told it was like the metro stations in Fallout 3, which turned me off slightly, because those stations weren't my favourite portion of that game, full of ghouls. ^^' Even though it's a completely different game I'm somewhat scarred from that metro experience.
    Hmm, Metro 2033 I may get around to considering how much I've enjoyed Last Light, but a game like Fallout I doubt I'll ever touch ^^'. Nothing to say of the games quality, but huge, expansive free-roam RPG's like that with a library of side-quest, and the way games like that tend to be structured with those elements, just aren't for me. As for Fallouts Metro's levels, I can't really say what they'll be like, but given what I know about Fallout, I do doubt they're similar aside from similarities with the aesthetics of the surroundings and the mutants. You should check out the Demo, it's a pretty fair representation of the game ^^

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  6. #6
    Prosecuting with style Vyse the Legend's Avatar
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    Really nice review Inty, again the attention to detail you put into your reviews shines through again, so kudos!

    As for the game, rather like the situation I find myself in with Blood Dragon, this is another of those games that I might potentially try, more so as I hear lots of good things about, despite really not enjoying the previous game. So might be another I end up having to demo to see if it plays rather like the original, as if it does, think I'd be tempted to give this a pass.

  7. #7
    Can you call me Nyteblade YesConsiderably's Avatar
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    While humanity hasn't given up hope, it's clear that they can't make any great push against the superior antagonists
    It's not that clear to me considering it happened in the first game, though there is some question as to whether the Dark Ones were/are antagonistic towards humanity. While the games and the novels on which they're based depict a world that is extraordinarily bleak - especially by post-apocalyptic standards - humanity isn't quite cowering in a corner.

    This is a world in which humans are forced to brave the surface world in search of salvage, knowing the chances of not returning are high. It is also a world in which the disparate factions - the Reds, the Nazis - are gearing up for full-on war.

    I'm also having a hard time believing the game is dragged down by fan-service. I finished the Theatre level last night, and there was a pretty compelling reason for having the character sit through a stage show in which the opening act was a group of girls dancing the can-can in their knickers.

    It's supposed to demonstrate how far the capital of Russian culture has fallen. While Bolshoi was renowned for its art pre-event, it now lures in tourists with shows that appeal to a more base nature.

    Sure, the physics were a bit odd. It could be something to do with the 1940's-style brassieres, but i'm yet to play a game that got the movement of that part of a lady's body right. Even the Witcher 2, which had full-frontal nudity, and even whored Triss Merrigold out to Playboy for a 'cyber-girls' issue, didn't look right. I suppose developers have to ask themselves whether they 'stick or twist'; do they bother with movement or not.

    In the Witcher 2 they did not, and it looked really, really weird. Distractingly so.

    And it really did seem to me that as far as the dancing girls were concerned, more effort was put into their dialogue. The bitchy conversation overheard in the dressing room was more entertaining than the scantily-clad show.

    Anyway, i think that Metro Last Light will appeal more to those who didn't enjoy Metro 2033 than those who did. They've polished the game so much that i can practically see my face in it. This is good in a way, but it does take something away from the original, where the shoddiness sort of helped to create that feeling of desolation and hopelessness.

    Of course, the atmosphere in Last Light is so good that you should feel this anyway, but i can see why some players were disappointed.

    I also like the little touches. In a lot of FPS games, crawling through a vent just means crouching and proceeding as normal, but here there are special animations for entering and exiting. You also need to wipe the elements from your visor when up on the surface on occasion.

    The weapons are stronger and the ammo more plentiful - which is more than i can say about the metro's supply of carrots. Enemies have real trouble seeing in the dark, which renders a stealthy approach much, much easier to pull off. Maybe a little too easy.

    But if you found 2033 a chore, you'll probably appreciate this.

  8. #8
    Disciplinary. INTY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YesConsiderably View Post
    It's not that clear to me considering it happened in the first game, though there is some question as to whether the Dark Ones were/are antagonistic towards humanity. While the games and the novels on which they're based depict a world that is extraordinarily bleak - especially by post-apocalyptic standards - humanity isn't quite cowering in a corner.

    This is a world in which humans are forced to brave the surface world in search of salvage, knowing the chances of not returning are high. It is also a world in which the disparate factions - the Reds, the Nazis - are gearing up for full-on war.

    I'm also having a hard time believing the game is dragged down by fan-service. I finished the Theatre level last night, and there was a pretty compelling reason for having the character sit through a stage show in which the opening act was a group of girls dancing the can-can in their knickers.

    It's supposed to demonstrate how far the capital of Russian culture has fallen. While Bolshoi was renowned for its art pre-event, it now lures in tourists with shows that appeal to a more base nature.
    .
    Ah, fair comment considering that push against the Dark ones, how ever you've definitely misinterpreted me =P. I didn't at all say that I thought they were cowering in a corner. In fact, I pretty much said the same as you just did here. Humanity haven't given up hope, but they can't make some great push to re-claim their world, I suppose I should have left it at. I'll edit that now.

    Also, the game isn't dragged down by fan-service, I said it simply lets it down. And erh, it's not at the stage show value, the section in particular that brings it down due to its immaturity is somewhat further in. And again it doesn't drag it down, far from it, it's just a section in the game where you're just suddenly taken out of the game.
    Last edited by INTY; 21-05-2013 at 05:55 PM.

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  9. #9
    Can you call me Nyteblade YesConsiderably's Avatar
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    You're talking about the dance then? That you have to pay to receive?

    Not gonna lie, i liked the way that scene played out. I declined the dance as in the first game there were two different endings and to unlock the better one you had to behave in a 'moral way'... but the set up was pretty good.

    I guess i only find that sort of thing bothersome when it drags down established characters, which nudity doesn't always do. I'm nearing the end and am yet to come across anything that i feel lets down Glukhovsky's world.
    Last edited by YesConsiderably; 21-05-2013 at 06:56 PM.

  10. #10
    Disciplinary. INTY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YesConsiderably View Post
    You're talking about the dance then? That you have to pay to receive?

    I guess i only find that sort of thing bothersome when it drags down established characters, which nudity doesn't always do. I'm nearing the end and am yet to come across anything that i feel lets down Glukhovsky's world.
    Ah, it's just the immature nature of it that's the issue here, nothing such as breaking established characters, but the area does put a speed bump into the atmosphere of the world. I think Angry Joe's described the issue to it's best so far. Given the nature and details that the atmosphere tries to achieve, a sudden section of ass and titties that's displayed to you so immaturely as to have a girl that can dance on you repeatedly, as I said while in context, just doesn't meld with the moods and tones the game tries to set. Just an entire section of the game that's gone as soon as it comes, doesn't fit in, and, really just wasn't important or needed. Just something that couldn't be looked over as an objective problem for its effects on the mood, which is one of the more crucial aspects to the game. Doesn't bring the game down, just...I suppose a speed bump would be the best way to put it, suddenly stops it in its tracks, and then you're back in the game
    Truth be told I of course enjoyed Joe's explanation section more than mine, but I'm not that energetic of a person, heh
    Last edited by INTY; 21-05-2013 at 07:36 PM.

    Oh **** the color from the sig doesn't match the new layout any more.
    Erhm
    bah **** it, I'm replacing it for New Year anyway


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